PERLREDBLINK.GIF (995 bytes) CD-ROM NASA 1 COD. HMSNASA1 PERLREDBLINK.GIF (995 bytes)

CD-ROM com todos os documentos citados abaixo, com toda tecnologia de motores foguetes a propelente sólido. O material mais completo existente no mundo.

+1200 páginas - R$ 40,00 (incluso as despesas de envio)


Solid rocket motor metal cases, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical Propulsion), NASA SP-8025 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), April 1970, pp. 103, (70N29740).

Abstract: Guidelines and practices for design of solid rocket motor cases.


Solid Rocket Motor Performance Analysis and Prediction, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical Propulsion), NASA SP-8039 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), July 1965 Revised May 1971, pp. 113, (72N18785).

Abstract: Current design practices are reviewed and assessed, and guidance is established for achieving greater consistency in design, reliability in the end product, and efficiency in the design effort. The total problem is discussed, and design elements involved in successful design are identified. Design criteria are described, and the rule, guide, limitation, or standard which must be imposed on each essential design element is given. Recommended practices are presented for satisfying each of the criteria.


Captive-fired testing of solid rocket motors , NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical Propulsion), NASA SP-8041 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), March 1971, pp. 101, (71N30866).

Abstract: Captive-fired testing of solid rocket motors for design criteria


Solid Rocket Motor Igniters, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical Propulsion), NASA SP-8051 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), June 1970, pp. 111, (71N30346).

Abstract: Design approach for solid propellant rocket igniters


Solid propellant selection and characterization, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8064 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), Jun 1971, pp. 116, (72N13737).

Abstract: The techniques of propellant selection and characterization and the compromises that may be forced on the designer by the change of a propellant parameter are discussed. Rules for the selection of a general propellant type are presented. The characterization of various propellant properties is then approached parameter by parameter. Tailoring pitfalls and compromises are identified whenever possible, and appropriate cross references are used. Related design criteria monographs frequently are cited for a more detailed treatment of the topic under discussion. A list of source references is provided. These references, coupled with established texts in the field, should give the depth of knowledge necessary to the designer to aid in the selection of the most nearly optimum propellant for the design application.


Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8075 , NASA (Washington, DC, United States), Oct 1971, pp. 82.

Abstract: The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.


Solid propellant grain design and internal ballistics, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8076 , NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), Mar 1972, pp. 110, (73N15804).

Abstract: The ballistic aspects of grain design were studied to outline the steps necessary to achieve a successful grain design. The relationships of the grain design to steady-state mass balance and erosive burning are considered. Grain design criteria is reviewed, and recommended design criteria are included.


Solid propellant grain structural integrity analysis, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8073 , NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), Jun 1973, pp. 114.

Abstract: The structural properties of solid propellant rocket grains were studied to determine the propellant resistance to stresses. Grain geometry, thermal properties, mechanical properties, and failure modes are discussed along with design criteria and recommended practices.


Solid rocket thrust vector control, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8114 , NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), Dec 1974, pp. 200, (76N17194).

Abstract: Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.


Solid rocket motor nozzles, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8115 , NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), Jun 1975, pp. 140, (76N20214).

Abstract: The steps in the nozzle design process are examined. The nozzle designer's role in defining design requirements and constraints is included along with discussions of each of the three basic phases of the nozzle design process itself: (1) aerodynamic design, in which the gas-contacting surfaces are configured to produce the required performance within the envelope limits; (2) thermal design, in which thermal liners and thermal insulators are selected and configured to maintain the surfaces as closely as practical against effects of erosion and to limit the structure temperature to acceptable levels; and (3) structural design, in which materials are selected and configured to support the thermal components and to sustain the predicted loads. Analytical techniques that are used to establish thermal and structural design integrity and to predict nozzle performance are discussed along with methods for nozzle quality assurance. Emphasis is placed on nozzle design and materials for modern high-temperature aluminized propellants. Recurring nozzle design problems of graphite cracking and ejection, differential erosion at material interfaces, lack of sufficient proven nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques, the uncertainty of adhesive bonding, and inadequate definition of material properties, particularly at high temperatures are considered.


Solid rocket motor internal insulation, NASA SPACE VEHICLE DESIGN CRITERIA (Chemical), NASA SP-8093 , NASA Lewis Research Center (Cleveland, OH, United States), Dec 1976, pp. 124, (77N30171).

Abstract: Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.